Decentralized renewable energy is the faster path to power for all

News & Announcements Stories Wanted: Let us shine a spotlight on you

Power for All is looking to spotlight the great work our partners are doing through story-telling. It can be visual -- through video, data visualization, or photo essays. It can be personal profiles. Stories about technology or business innovation. Or tales of improved livelihoods and jobs. You name it, we're probably interested.

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Our Latest Newsletter

Putting SDG7 to Work

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In Conversation with…

Abhishek Jain, CEEW

Who We Are

2 billion people—almost a third of humanity—lack access to reliable energy. Power for All is a global coalition of 200 private and public organizations campaigning to deliver universal energy access before 2030 through the power of decentralized, renewable electricity.
Learn more about Power for All »


News & Announcements Stories Wanted: Let us shine a spotlight on you

Power for All is looking to spotlight the great work our partners are doing through story-telling. It can be visual -- through video, data visualization, or photo essays. It can be personal profiles. Stories about technology or business innovation. Or tales of improved livelihoods and jobs. You name it, we're probably interested.

Articles 2018: Top Energy Access Tweets

Approaching 10,000 followers (with average 300,000 impressions per month), Power for All’s Twitter account is a window into the topics that most interest the distributed renewable energy sector. Twitter measures “Top Tweets” based of engagement and impressions. The themes that generated the biggest response in 2018? Mini-grids, and the jobs opportunity of energy access. Other topics of interest: consumer demand, market development, and data.

Energy Policy 2 Keys to Scaling Energy Access

Distributed renewables play an increasingly important role in promoting energy access, already accounting for 6 gigawatts of capacity in the developing world, with an expectation of providing over 60% of new electricity connections in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030. New analysis in Escaping the Energy Poverty Trap shows that national governments need two things to succeed in creating markets for distributed renewables: 1) institutional capacity and 2) local accountability mechanisms.

Peak
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PEAK (Platform for Energy Access Knowledge) is our interactive information exchange platform that aggregates and repackages the best research and thinking on energy access into compelling data-driven stories for those work­ing to make energy ser­vices acces­si­ble to all.

Explore PEAK »

Insights
Energy Policy 2 Keys to Scaling Energy Access

Distributed renewables play an increasingly important role in promoting energy access, already accounting for 6 gigawatts of capacity in the developing world, with an expectation of providing over 60% of new electricity connections in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030. New analysis in Escaping the Energy Poverty Trap shows that national governments need two things to succeed in creating markets for distributed renewables: 1) institutional capacity and 2) local accountability mechanisms.

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Check out our Resources section for more reading

Resources
Research Summaries Mind The Pioneer Gap

Despite an increase in investment for distributed renewable companies over the past 5 years, most of it went to a handful of companies and 93% say they are still trapped in a "Pioneer Gap" between seed and commercial capital. More patient capital is needed. This is according to a recent report from campaign partner Acumen.

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Insights
Energy Policy Middle-Income Countries Big Winner from Off-Grid Energy. Who’s Next?

As demonstrated in by new data from IRENA, off-grid renewable electricity has grown tremendously across the world over the last decade, but growth was very uneven. Why was off-grid successful in some places and not others?

Sign up to receive our newsletter & occasional updates about our campaign and the progress being made in the DRE sector.

(We won’t share your info, and you’re free to opt out anytime. See our Privacy Policy for details.)